October 2012 Test Management Forum

The 35th Test Management Forum took place on Wednesday 24 October 2012 at the conference centre at Balls's Brothers, Minster Pavement. The meeting was sponsored by SQS UK and Intechnica and was, as usual, FREE to attend.

FULLY BOOKED

PROGRAMME

13.30pm Tea/Coffee
14.00pm Introductions
14.15pm Paul Gerrard, Gerrard Consulting: Open Source Script Languages and Utilities - What Every Tester Should Know Sam Clark, nFocus: ALM - an opportunity for testing to breathe life back into quality? Matt Robson, Mastek: From On-shore to the Moon
15.30pm Tea/Coffee
16.00pm Adam Brown, Quotium: Application Security – Should QA be more involved? Could QA be more involved? Mike Jarred and Ilca Moussavou, IDBS: Statistical Process Control and Metrication – A case study for software development process improvement Xavier McGlynn, SQS: Inshore: Best Practises for Managing Offshore Performance Test Teams
17.15pm Drinks Reception



Session Abstracts

Mike Jarred and Ilca Moussavou, IDBS: Statistical Process Control and Metrication – A case study for software development process improvement

We all struggle at times to relate to executives (VP’s, CEO’s, Senior Management peers) and demonstrate the value of testing. Do these problems/situations resonate with you?

  • Testing perceived as a bottleneck
  • Not enough resources to support all the work required from the test function
  • The value of testing not universally accepted
  • Testing process improvement driven by practitioners, but not necessarily aligned to business objectives

Quality was viewed subjectively, with different interpretation by different stakeholders. The same stakeholders look to testing to assure the quality of software development with no quality definition.

This session explores how the IDBS Testing Group addressed these and other challenges, through the use of Statistical Process Control and metrics captured during testing projects. The session will be part case study of the journey the IDBS Test Group is on to not only address these common issues, but using the information presented to executives to drive change throughout the development lifecycle to improve quality. There will be time to discuss the challenges faced and whether any similar challenges the TMF members have could be solved with similar approaches. This session augments some of the themes and discussion areas explored in previous sessions at the Test Summit & TMF by Ben Fry under the Quality Initiative. A key topic within the Quality Initiative this session aligns with is “exploring the role Test Management can play in influencing an organisation’s approach to adopting a more cohesive approach to removing defects as early in the lifecycle as possible.”

Please note: This session will not be debating what quality means – the speakers request that attendees appreciate that quality is subjective, and each organisation has its own responsibility to define quality in the context of their products and services.

Matt Robson, Mastek: From On-shore to the Moon
"An attempt to identify the major sourcing models in testing and to discuss the relative applicability of them: On shore, off shore, near shore, the moon, crowd sourcing, in house, out house, nutbush city limits, outsource, in source, call the posse, young and old. "

Sam Clark, nFocus: ALM - an opportunity for testing to breathe life back into quality?
 "Application Lifecycle Management is increasingly seen as delivering significant benefits to a business, by enabling governance throughout the life of a business application from conception through application retirement.

ALM covers more than just development of an application; it reaches into the initial business objectives and on through operational aspects including upgrades, cost of ownership and retirement. It also helps ensure that those original business outcomes are met successfully.

ALM is independent of development methodologies and scales according to the size of the project or programme. The business, small or large, needs constant reassurance that the application to be implemented will do the right job at the right price, will be of sufficient quality and delivers the anticipated return on investment and business outcomes during its lifetime.

This workshop will look at how the testing and quality assurance profession can step up to the challenges of working in this environment, by being an integral part of the governance process driving quality throughout the application lifecycle. It will cover (but is not limited to) opportunities, challenges, roles, skills, supporting infrastructure and barriers when working in this environment.

Adam Brown, Quotium: Application Security – Should QA be more involved? Could QA be more involved?
"Application security testing is something that is too often overlooked. How do we know? Because of the huge breaches seen over the last few years that come through the applications themselves. Security is seen as a subject purely for the domain of the security department, the security department see application security as the responsibility of development. Less than 1 in 100 developers has ever had any security training so what can be done? Security testing is often outsourced and too late in the process. Often findings are dealt with in a ‘fire fighting’ manner, and hence patches are produced rather than secure software in the 1st place. In this session I aim to discuss application security, show some figures, talk about some development processes and technology approaches for application security verification while discussing experiences that the audience have faced. Finally, unless there are any objections, for the last 10 minutes and for those interested I’d like to show some new technology."
(This talk carried over from the July Forum).

Ian Molyneaux, Intechnica: Application Performance Monitoring – An Independent Overview of the Benefits to Testing, and the tools available - POSTPONED

Xavier McGlynn, SQS: Inshore: Best Practises for Managing Offshore Performance Test Teams

Topics:

1. Reasons for and against offshoring in general
2. Reasons why it works and why it doesn’t
3. Suggestions to exploit the successes and mitigate the potential for failure

"Consultancies and clients alike will sometimes see the offshore model as a good match for the requirements they have. In these circumstances it is important that the correct management and structure is applied to ensure that the delivery on the project is a success. The perception of the way it is delivered is as, if not more, important as the delivery itself. Demonstrating a team of offshore consultants who are highly visible, technically strong and knowledgeable about the clients’ business will make a tremendous difference to the way the client perceives your company."