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nFocus' blog has moved!

nFocus Blog - Thu, 22/02/2018 - 11:33
nFocus' blog has moved!

You can now access nFocus' blog at: http://blog.nfocussoftwaretesting.com

Categories: Software Testing

How to develop tests in reverse with portable stimulus

Test And Verification Services Blog - Thu, 22/02/2018 - 09:10

Whether developing tests for software or hardware, test development seems to follow a pretty predictable process. Portable Stimulus brings some very powerful features to the table in raising the level of abstraction at which test intent can be captured. Because the description is declarative, a PSS description is very easy to reuse, shape, and customize without changing the fundamental description. This article from Mentor Graphics explores how to develop tests in reverse using portable stimulus.

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Find out how T&VS portable stimulus specification addresses today industry verification challenges.

The post How to develop tests in reverse with portable stimulus appeared first on T&VS.

Categories: Software Testing

Four Common Mistakes That Make Automated Testing More Difficult

Test And Verification Services Blog - Thu, 22/02/2018 - 09:05

Automated testing can make your life easier, but only if done properly. It is an essential step in the development process. Unfortunately, writing automated tests is often skipped because it’s difficult or there is a high maintenance cost associated with the tests written. Many of the difficulties of writing and maintaining tests can be traced back to a handful of common coding mistakes. This article examines these mistakes, how they negatively impact testing, and offers tips on how to resolve them.

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Find how T&VS Test Automation Services enables organisations to increase the effectiveness, efficiency, and coverage of their software testing.

The post Four Common Mistakes That Make Automated Testing More Difficult appeared first on T&VS.

Categories: Software Testing

How Continuous Vulnerabilities Assessment and Penetration Testing Protect You Against Cyber Attacks

Test And Verification Services Blog - Thu, 22/02/2018 - 08:09

Cyber-attacks hit the headlines daily and they are not only a threat to large corporations, but also to small businesses and individuals. A vulnerabilities assessment typically involves using automated testing tools such as security scanners to generate reports on website or network weaknesses. Penetration testing is more goal-oriented and involves an authorised attempt by registered testers to exploit flaws and gain access to your company’s data assets. This article explores how continuous vulnerabilities assessment and penetration testing can help you protect against cyber-attacks.

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Understand how T&VS Penetration Testing services help you protect & defend against latest and future attacks and maintain compliance, eliminate IT security threats, & can reveal how hackers may breach systems.

The post How Continuous Vulnerabilities Assessment and Penetration Testing Protect You Against Cyber Attacks appeared first on T&VS.

Categories: Software Testing

A method to the madness: How to think about security and privacy for IoT

Test And Verification Services Blog - Thu, 22/02/2018 - 08:03

IoT is often considered to be such an innovative and disruptive technology migration that many consider it to be something completely new, like nothing ever seen before. This article explains how to build and deploy connected devices in ways that deliver robust considerations of both security and privacy and describes how to address the security and privacy challenges to ensure that IoT is adopted in a manner that effectively integrates attack resiliency and privacy protections.

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Find out how T&VS IoT services help organization overcome the safety, security & privacy challenges and deliver secure connected products to the market.

The post A method to the madness: How to think about security and privacy for IoT appeared first on T&VS.

Categories: Software Testing

How to Verify Design-For-Testability (DFT) with Hardware Emulation

Test And Verification Services Blog - Thu, 22/02/2018 - 07:01

A DFT App enables execution of complete pattern sets for DFT verification in a reasonable time to shorten the pattern development cycle. Scalable hardware and a compiler enables test pattern validation for large gate-level designs with scan and other test structures embedded into the design. The DFT App is interoperable with other tools by supporting standard STIL format file.  Verification Consultant, Lauro Rizzatti, describes how hardware emulation provides enough verification power to move DFT into the chip design thus accelerating the time to market, improves performance, increasing the yield, and ultimately augmenting profits.

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Find out more about how T&VS adds Design for Testability to services portfolio, enabling customers to reduce time to market.

The post How to Verify Design-For-Testability (DFT) with Hardware Emulation appeared first on T&VS.

Categories: Software Testing

Cambridge Lean Coffee

James Thomas' blog - Thu, 22/02/2018 - 06:30

This month's Lean Coffee was hosted by Roku. Here's some brief, aggregated comments and questions on topics covered by the group I was in.

My favourite context-free test is ...
  • Turn everything up to 11. Put all of the settings on their highest levels and see what happens.
  • Power cycling rapidly and repeatedly.
  • Sympathetic testing. Just getting a view for what the product offers.
  • Simply trying to use the product.
  • Smoke test.
  • Try to do the opposite of what any documentation says.
  • Ask how the users will use it.
  • Ask what the customer wanted.
  • Find someone without prior experience of the product to look at it.

How do you enhance your personal development in a busy environment?
  • We are given time for personal development at work, but I end up dong work stuff instead. 
  • The company empowers us but it's on us to use the time.
  • I don't want the others on my team to feel that I am slacking by taking the personal development time.
  • I might come in to work early to do some personal development but then find myself picking something up from the backlog.
  • I want to learn python but, because I know I can do it, I'll always revert to bash for quick scripts.
  • I did a Masters degree and the structure, and deadlines, particularly exams, helped me to focus on it.
  • Book slots in the diary for it.
  • Make joint commitments with others because you'll keep them more reliably.
  • Our company puts tasks into backlogs for training, so it's explicit.
  • Can you find goals that can be done on every project, rather than needing time set aside?
  • We might like to do a hack day.
  • We had an internal team conference.

A development process with no mention of testing.
  • Our company has produced a process for architecting or rearchitecting software, something all teams must follow.
  • It says things like "talk to X before going too far down the road in such-and-such an area".
  • ... but it has no mention of testing in it. Should it have?
  • If it's about rearchitecting, perhaps there are already tests? 
  • Or you can use the original implementation as a reference.
  • It's on you to explain the value of testing.
  • Any change to the code base can yield bugs.
  • "We're just moving classes around" being safe is a dangerous assumption.
  • Where's do you think there might be problem? For example, is it that there's no mention of testing in the document, or that you think that nothing you'd call testing will happen, or something else?

How do you avoid mini waterfalls in Agile?
  • There is a natural process: work has to be done and won't be ready until the sprint end. Then it's handed over and needs testing!
  • Are sprints a necessity?
  • No. Some teams work in continuous flow.
  • Could you try pairing, to remove or reduce the impact of the handover point?
  • Could you break work down into smaller chunks?
  • Could you have predetermined acceptance criteria? (And non-acceptance criteria?)
  • Could the stories be closed earlier (e.g. are the developers hanging on to them after finishing?)
  • Could there be too much work in progress, so stories progress slowly?
  • Can you sit with the developers? Proximity breaks down barriers.

What is a good job interview?
  • From whose perspective?
  • Do you ask interviewees to do a task, write tests, talk through their CV?
  • How do you react to tasks as an interviewee?
  • I've rejected roles because of how the company has come across to me.
  • I've accepted roles because the task was interesting and enjoyable.
  • Interviewee: show their best in whatever respects are important to them and for the role.
  • Interviewer: facilitated in a way that let the interviewee show their best in areas that are important to the company, got some sense of the interviewee as a person, and saw how they can think.
  • I think of interviews as auditions.
Image: https://flic.kr/p/5YB8zB
Categories: Software Testing

Considering a Career in Software Testing?

Alan Richardson's Blog - Wed, 21/02/2018 - 21:53
TLDR; A career in Software Testing is not an ‘easy’ ride, if you are not careful then you can get stuck. But if you work at it then you can make a difference to your company and the community at large.

Are you considering a career in Software Testing? Have you watched videos describing your future job opportunities and the training or roles you have to consider?

Well, this blog post and associated video might help. I’ve distilled my 20+ years of Software Testing and Development experience into some Software Testing Career advice notes.

And this isn’t just for beginners and people at the start of their career. I hope this advice will help you even if you have been a Software Tester for a few years.




We will cover topics such as:

  • Is there much to learn?
  • What opportunities are available?
  • What types of Software Testing could you do?
  • Is testing a Stepping Stone to becoming a Programmer?
  • Is testing really an entry level role?
  • How to create career opportunities?
  • Should I learn to code?
  • How do I get started?
  • What should I read?
  • How to recognise a bad job?
  • How to escape a bad job?
  • Should you start by learning to automate?
  • Should you get certification?
Some of this might only be covered in the video!

I’ve pursued Software Testing as a Career for 20+ years, so I’m going to let you in on the reality of pursuing this topic as a career.

Is there much to learn?You have the chance, over your career, to become very technical if you want to: deep diving into the technology and manipulating the system under the covers, performance testing, security testing, automating applications.

You also have the option to focus more on the people and work more closely with users and requirements. There can be a lot of opportunities.

You can also do both.

Software Testing is a skill. It can take a long time to learn. There is a lot to learn.

Read as much as you canStart with the free Testing Magazines (remember to search the web and see if there are any more).

Read the blogs listed on the Ministry of Testing Feeds site

Follow testers on twitter (see who they follow and then keep going)

Soon you will be overloaded with information.

Read as many books as you can. In the video I recommend:

  • Software Testing Techniques by Boris Beizer
  • Lessons Learned in Software Testing - Bach, Kaner, Pettichord
  • Testing Computer Software - Kaner, Falk, Nguyen
I spent a year working through the Beizer book (Software Testing Techniques) and applying it to my work.

Read as many as you can get your hands on.

Stepping Stone to Programmer?Some people view Software Testing as a stepping stone role to becoming a programmer.

Rule that out now.

If you want a career as a programmer you should start by focussing on programming.

You might get lucky, If you are in the right company, working as a tester, and you want to work as a programmer, they might support that shift. But be honest with yourself. If you want to program. Program. If you want to test. Test.

If you are not sure. Try both. If you try both then you’ll probably be in a stronger position long term.

But it depends how much time you have to get ready.

Getting StartedThe hard part is getting your first job.

It is very important to learn the fundamental and underlying techniques that are associated with Software Testing. A lot of people miss this out.

People at the moment seem to think that if you pursue a certification that you will learn these techniques and you are instantly a good software tester.

We have to distinguish between: the learning you need to do to get a job, and the learning you need to fulfil the role of a good software tester.

Hopefully you’ll be able to get a job by demonstrating software skill via a blog or a Github account and don’t have to pursue certification, but that is a choice you will have to make for yourself.

Software Testing is still viewed as an entry level roleThat can make it easier to get a job as a software tester.

But if you do not control your career and keep learning then you might get stuck in a low level, unskilled testing role with a company that does not value your chosen path.

Once you have earned your stripes, find a company that does not view the tester as an entry level role.

It can be easier to switch to Software TestingFrom Business Analyst, designer, manager, programmer it can be easier to switch to testing.

Sometimes because people undervalue and don’t understand testing.

Sometimes because they see potential in you and recognise that you have the creativity, tenacity, problem exploration, questioning mind required to be good at Software Testing.

You need to get in the right CompanyOnce you are in and you’ve paid your dues:

  • hands on experience
  • some tool knowledge
  • mastered at least one technology - API, Web, Mobile, Desktop
  • good grounding in the domain (terminology and techniques)
Move to a good company:

  • values testing
  • working flexibly (Agile, Contextually)
  • automating acceptance criteria
  • offers you the chance to learn more
It is possible to get stuckParticularly with outsourcing companies

  • spending days writing lots of documents
  • writing test cases and test scripts that require a lot of rework
  • automating badly with a lot of maintenance
  • automating but not learning how to code or automate effectively - building keyword scripts but not implementing the keywords
All of that is going to keep you in the low paid dungeon of Software Testing.

To escape you can:

  • focus on testing as a problem solving activity - modelling systems, exploring systems, looking for risk, building experiments.
  • build your coding skills to automate and write tools to support your testing and work more closely with programmers
  • learn how systems are architected to understand them as a whole and identify risk and alternative ways to design systems
  • focus on testing as a questioning process - identifying ambiguity in requirements and discussions and helping remove that ambiguity
  • focus on the outcomes of testing rather than the legacy processes e.g. people want to know about the coverage of testing - find ways to track and visualise coverage but not in terms of ‘number of test cases written’ and ‘test scripts executed’
  • learn about Agile, and Lean, and take control of your own test processes to remove waste and the parts of your process that do not add value
What I’m really talking about there is building your expertise as a Software Developer - or Software Engineer - but retaining a specialism in testing so that everything you learn you apply to the process of Software Testing.

Note: Developer does not mean Programmer - it means someone involved in the whole lifecycle of Software Development.

The more that you can expand your Domain Knowledge to cover the Software Development Discipline as a whole, the better and more valuable a tester you will become.

You will constantly learn new things and identify new approaches and tools to help you test.

That won’t happen if you stick to a very legacy view of Software Testing as: creating test conditions, writing test cases, writing test scripts and using a Test Case management system.

Choose your companies carefully and get out of those that are stuck in the past.

Should you automate?I can’t tell you not to. Because I know how to.

I started with programming as my specialism and I kept my programming knowledge up to date.

I think the ability to code helps me because I have more options in how I approach my work.

You probably don’t need to:

  • learn to code as well as a production level programmer
    • certainly not at the start of your career (you can improve your coding skills over time)
You certainly don’t need to:

  • learn to code at the expense of learning how to test
    • you don’t need to know how to code to test, having the ability to code gives you more options, but is not required.
I would recommend you concentrate on test techniques and the actual practice of testing.

Learn to code later on. And learn in small chunks by automating your work or scripting the tools you use. Build it up over time.

I’ve been doing this for 20+ years and I’m confident with production level coding, I’m also confident with testing - take the long term view and build your skills over time.

Should you learn to develop?I think Software Development is meta to testing and programming and analysis and management.

So learning Software Engineering: modelling, requirements, concepts, architecture.

All of that will help in the short term (and long term), much more than how to write a script in a programming language.

You should learn how to testFind some open source software. Test it. Make notes online and share your learning.

Use your work time wisely to learn as much as you can.

There are a lot of opportunities within testing - if you can find the right company to work with.

And if you work hard, experiment, and share what you learn then you can open up new opportunities for others, as well as for yourself.

The above was the notes I used to create the video below. The video expands on the above and has additional information about Agile, Automating, Technical Testing and some other stuff.

Categories: Agile, Software Testing

Early Hardware Emulation — Birth of a New Technology

Test And Verification Services Blog - Wed, 21/02/2018 - 04:00

In the early days, hardware emulation was used for only the most sophisticated, challenging designs at the time. Verification Consultant, Lauro Rizzatti, describes how the hardware emulation is realizing its own potential and outlines why the early hardware emulation is the birth of a modern technology.

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Find out how T&VS Hardware Emulation services allow verifying the robustness of a design and helps optimize the design for improved performance.

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Categories: Software Testing

Types of Software Testing Models

Test And Verification Services Blog - Wed, 21/02/2018 - 03:56

Testing is an integral part of software development life cycle. Various models or approaches are used in the software development process where each model has its own advantages and disadvantages. Choosing a particular model depends on the project deliverables and complexity of the project. This article explores the various software testing models and outlines the pros and cons of using each model in the SDLC.

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Find out how T&VS Software Testing services help you to establish a cost-effective software testing facility that delivers improved quality, reduces risks and time-to market.

The post Types of Software Testing Models appeared first on T&VS.

Categories: Software Testing

Automakers: Manage Connected-Car Data Before It Manages You

Test And Verification Services Blog - Wed, 21/02/2018 - 03:51

Cars now generate an enormous amount of data every day. As vehicles become more complex, the amount of information is expected to severely strain data networks and cloud infrastructure, creating a serious need for a new network and computing infrastructure solution. This article from Electronic Design highlights how manufacturers must address the influx of data in the connected car through proper management techniques.

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Learn more about how T&VS Automotive Verification and Test solutions help to address the challenges of delivering safe, secure and compliant automotive products.

The post Automakers: Manage Connected-Car Data Before It Manages You appeared first on T&VS.

Categories: Software Testing

The Cybersecurity Concerns of Driverless Cars

Test And Verification Services Blog - Wed, 21/02/2018 - 03:46

An autonomous vehicle is what’s known as a cyber-physical system because it has elements in both the physical and virtual worlds. This makes security particularly challenging. Not only are they at risk from traditional cyber-attacks to the information and running of the vehicle, but also to a new breed of attacks around things such as ransomware and vehicle theft. This article examines the privacy and cyber security issues concerning driverless cars.

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Learn more about how T&VS Automotive Verification and Test solutions help to address the challenges of delivering safe, secure and compliant automotive products.

The post The Cybersecurity Concerns of Driverless Cars appeared first on T&VS.

Categories: Software Testing

Putting Design Back Into DFT

Test And Verification Services Blog - Wed, 21/02/2018 - 03:39

Test always has been a delicate balance between cost and quality, but there are several changes happening in the industry that might cause a significant alteration in strategy. This article from Semi engineering outlines the new DFT techniques and describes the new requirements that come from technologies such as 2.5D and 3D integration.

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Explore how T&VS effectively deliver end-to-end DFT support from design all the way to silicon.

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Categories: Software Testing

Turning Down the Voltage

Test And Verification Services Blog - Tue, 20/02/2018 - 03:46

Designers of large, advanced-node SoCs are grappling with a number of pressures in the quest to achieve the optimal performance and power of their designs. This has turned into a challenging balancing act between using less power, while also providing the same or greater performance and increased functionality. This article explores why the complexity of SoC is making it more difficult to combine functional performance with demands for lower power.

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Find out how T&VS Verification services help to meet the challenging requirements with respect to performance, flexibility and verify the today’s complex designs effectively.

The post Turning Down the Voltage appeared first on T&VS.

Categories: Software Testing

Reasons why your software/App needs manual testing

Test And Verification Services Blog - Tue, 20/02/2018 - 03:40

Manual testing is the hidden crunch without which a solution cannot be successfully launched in the market. Automated testing can speed up the process and is often seen as a replacement for manual testing. However, manual testing still has a critical role in the QA process. No matter how much automated testing evolves, there will always be a place for manual testing in software. This article highlights the reasons why manual testing is still important for the software app.

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Find out how T&VS Software Testing services help you to establish a cost-effective software testing facility that delivers improved quality, reduces risks and time-to market.

The post Reasons why your software/App needs manual testing appeared first on T&VS.

Categories: Software Testing

Imperfect Silicon, Near-Perfect Security

Test And Verification Services Blog - Tue, 20/02/2018 - 03:35

With the growth of the IoT, going from billion to million devices, and the focus by attackers are down the stack, silicon-based security is playing an increasing role in protecting technology and users. This article explores how physically unclonable functions (PUF) are seeming to be tailor-made for IoT security.

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Find out how T&VS IoT services helps to build a foundation of trust, security and safety in the Industrial IoT devices.

The post Imperfect Silicon, Near-Perfect Security appeared first on T&VS.

Categories: Software Testing

Medical Technology and IoT: Mitigating Security Risks

Test And Verification Services Blog - Tue, 20/02/2018 - 03:30

The intersection of medical technology and the IoT signifies a revolution in the way healthcare is practiced and delivered today. IoT connected devices which constantly stream information and health records to the cloud, inevitably place patient identity and data at risk. This article highlights how to reduce the IoT security risks in medical industry and outlines why medical technology manufacturers and healthcare providers should try to implement and follow security procedures to protect patient data and health networks. Read More

Learn more about how T&VS IoT driven connected healthcare services can help organizations innovate and improve patient satisfaction and boost treatment outcomes.

The post Medical Technology and IoT: Mitigating Security Risks appeared first on T&VS.

Categories: Software Testing

All change!

Steve Watson's "Musings of a Test Manager" - Sat, 17/02/2018 - 19:36
Well, following the success of my January 1st posting, things on the blog front have been very quiet – but that doesn’t reflect my life in any way at all. In mid January my role was put at risk of … Continue reading →
Categories: Software Testing

Dual Focus Will Help Adoption

Test And Verification Services Blog - Fri, 16/02/2018 - 06:19

One of the great things associated with the development of a standard, such as the Portable Stimulus Standard (PSS), is that it brings together various stakeholders. This article from EDA Café describes how the System Verilog and UVM users adopt the PSS DSL (Domain Specific Language).

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Find out how T&VS Verification services help to meet the challenging requirements with respect to performance, flexibility and verify the today’s complex designs effectively.

The post Dual Focus Will Help Adoption appeared first on T&VS.

Categories: Software Testing

Conflating ISO 26262 and DO-254

Test And Verification Services Blog - Fri, 16/02/2018 - 06:01

Increasingly, the DO-254 industry is turning to general purpose computing platforms to implement functionality with safety of life implications. This is creating opportunities for electronics to be developed that can be used to support both avionics and automotive applications. These two domains employ somewhat similar design assurance guidelines for electronic hardware found in ISO 26262 and DO-254. Each guideline addresses safety-requirements, design activities, verification and validation, and configuration management. This article describes a difference between both ISO 26262 and DO-254 and outlines how to combine both the standards into a one standard.

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Find how T&VS helps to achieve safety compliance in hardware and software development.

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Categories: Software Testing

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