Test Management Forum 26 October 2016

The 52nd Test Management Forum took place on Wednesday 26 October 2016 at the conference centre at Balls's Brothers, Minster Court

Sponsored by Cognizant

Timetable

Session A

Thomas Crabtree, Ten10, "Is Mobile test automation pointless?"

 

Session B

Ian Howles, Cognizant, "SMAC Your Quality, How Social, Mobile, Analytics and Cloud technologies are reshaping QA and Change"

Ian's slides are here

Session C

Susan Windsor, WMHL Consulting, "Is there value in Test Assurance when Testing is Outsourced?"

Session D

Mike Bartley, TVS, “IoT Device Testing: can we provide assurance in the new wild west?”

Session E

Scott Tolley, Synopsis, "Security Test Optimisation Through Prioritisation"

Session F

Paul Gerrard, "Does Test Management Exist? Should TMF Move with the Times?"

Pauls slides are here

Programme

Ian Howles, Cognizant, "SMAC Your Quality, How Social, Mobile, Analytics and Cloud technologies are reshaping QA and Change"

This session will be a discussion on our futures as testers and how we deal with the massive changes ahead.

The world we live in today is changing faster than ever, the trends for change are evolving on a daily basis, starting with Social, Mobile, Analytics and Cloud, and evolving into the Internet of Things (IoT). 

We are living in an increasingly connected, always on world.  Estimates suggest that in the next four to five years there will be over 50 billion connected devices and sensors.  The services we consume based upon this hyper connectivity is morphing to become more and more customer centric.

In this session will look at the effects of the ‘Digital’ change and poses the following questions for debate:

  • What does the immediate future hold?
  • Were next?
  • How or even can we assure quality in the future?
  • How do we as individuals deal with the changes?

And finally...

As we move to autonomy and AI, how do we assess the ethics of the products that will be making decisions on our behalf in the future?”

Mike Bartley, TVS, “IoT Device Testing: can we provide assurance in the new wild west?”

The Internet of Things (IoT aka M2M) refers to an expanding network of interconnected internet-enabled devices. In the future everything will be connected, the current thinking is that only 2% of items in the world are connected and there is still 98% to go!  Estimates suggest that by 2020 there will be in the region of 50bn IoT devices – all talking with one another on a constant basis.

If you are a manufacturer, solution builder, or service provider, then how will you ensure that your solution works, will it stay connected to the different access points? IoT is going to drive the importance of interoperability between different markets/sectors and technologies. Customers today vote with their feet and are not loyal with poor performing products. How will you test your product with varying network conditions? How will your device work in the wild?

In this talk we will discuss what is required by a “IoT device testing lab” – e.g. conformance to all the standard protocols, connection with the standard network providers, some basic security testing?

We will also discuss whether we should consider an “IoT Kitemark” to provide some level of assurance?

Scott Tolley, Synopsis, "Security Test Optimisation Through Prioritisation"

Optimising testing through prioritisation : there are rarely enough hours in the day, and enough QA engineers on the payroll, to run every kind of test, on every part of the system, after every tiny little change delivered by the developers.  Words and phrases such as "agile methods", "DevOps", and "continuous anything" generally mean shorter QA cycles.  And that means making more choices.  Not just about what to test but also where to start.  Scott Tolley shares some personal experience (and opinions) on technical approaches to improving test optimisation through prioritisation both internally at Synopsys, his employer, and with clients in the field.  

Susan Windsor, WMHL Consulting, "Is there value in Test Assurance when Testing is Outsourced?"

As many organisations have chosen to outsource their testing (and an increasing number of suppliers offer this service), I want to explore the role of testing within the client organisation.  Does it exist and if so, what is its role?

Test assurance is increasingly an option for client organisations seeking to improve the management and delivery of their supplier’s outsourced service.  However, is this just a trend or can it really add value? 

To introduce this session, I’ll look at both sides of this argument and propose pro’s and con’s for each.  Then we’ll open up the discussion in true TMF fashion for debate.

If your organisation buys or delivers outsourced testing, this session will really benefit from your experience.  

Thomas Crabtree, Ten10, "Is mobile test automation pointless?"

Automating your testing is seen as a de facto practice, especially with the rise of Agile and more recently DevOps. So the natural solution to the challenge of mobile testing is to automate your mobile tests. Right? Well, no, not always! If your only solution is a hammer, then every problem is a nail. Automation encourages sticky checking, which can have real shortcomings in the rapidly changing landscape of new devices, browsers and operating systems. This workshop will debate the pros and cons of automated mobile testing and look at scenarios where other possible test approaches, such as exploratory testing, may prove a better solution.

Paul Gerrard, "Does Test Management Exist? Should TMF Move with the Times?"

For the past 10 or more years, I've been having conversations with test managers who have said things like, "We've been agiled - I don't seem to have a job anymore". The first few years of Agile, there didn't seem to be a role for testers at all. Over time, it became clear how testers fitted into Agile teams and they settled in as 'generic tester', 'technical tester', 'programmer support tester' or they take an assurance role to manage risk, advise on testing and be the general conscience of an Agile team. So test practitioners over time, are finding their feet.

But the Test Manager's journey is much less certain. There's perhaps no need to manage a team at all - the team is dispersed to different teams and smaller projects. There is no need for a single focused project test plan; there are no phases to manage; there is no need for day to day management of people, progress or reporting. Now the Digital revolution is taking off, it's even worse. Teams are shifting left, adopting DevOps, Continuous Delivery, analytics, SMAC and even shift-right.

Where does Test Management fit? Does Test Management as a disciplien even exist anymore?

This session explores the role of test management and managers and how the TMF might support this role in the future.